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Affib & Flutter 2021

Ventricular Tachycardia and Ventricular Fibrillation

Afib v. Flutter

 

In medical parlance, afib is another name for atrial fibrillation, and flutter is atrial flutter. Both terms are similar types of cardiac arrhythmias, which refer to an abnormal heart rhythm illustrated by irregular rhythms and impulses. Afib and flutter occur when one of the areas of the heart, the atrium, beats at an increased rate.

In a normal, healthy heart, the atria should contract when the ventricles switch to a state of rest. Reduction of the atria of blood into the ventricles. However, when the heart has an afib or flutter state, the atria do not contract consistently, and as a result, the ventricles do not fill with blood to maximum capacity. This leads to inefficient blood pumping, leading to symptoms such as weakness, dizziness, chest pain, and palpitations.

In the worst-case – general heart failure. In the form of a stroke, which can lead to permanent disability or death. The difference between afib and flutter is related to progression. First, flutter occurs and includes only a slight temporary arrhythmia. After a certain time, the heart will either return to normal routine surgery or develop afib. Afib can occur intermittently, but in the worst cases, it constantly suffers from the heart. Fluter can progress to afib if the affected person has a predisposition or has already developed the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, or mitral valve disorder.

Afib causes the blood left in the left atrium to clot, which can lead to more complications. Such clots can block arteries in any part of the body, cutting off blood flow to the affected area. Doctors determine the severity of afib by checking the symptoms of the victim and also measure the frequency of ventricular beating. A faster beat rate usually coincides with more severe symptoms and can serve as a prelude to stroke or general heart failure. Fluter and afib can be detected simply by checking a person’s heart rate.

If a doctor suspects flutter, he or she usually exposes the victim to an ECG or electrocardiography to confirm the arrhythmia. To determine if clots have formed in the left atrium, the doctor may also choose an ultrasound examination of the patient. During emergencies, when the victim experiences shock, loss of breath, or chest pain, the doctor may resort to a cardioverter-defibrillator that uses electricity to force the heart to return to its normal beating.

Medications such as propanol, diltiazem, verapamil, and digoxin may be administered to the patient to reduce the heartbeat. Note, however, that even if these drugs reduce flutter or afib, they may not be enough to fully restore a normal heartbeat. If these drugs are insufficient, additional drugs such as dofetilide, procainamide, and ibutilide can be administered to immediately restore a normal heartbeat. If any drugs or electric shocks are ineffective, the last resort is to cut off the connection between the ventricles and atrium and reconnect it through an artificial pacemaker. After treatment, the patient should be monitored for several months to ensure that flutter or afib does not recur.

Resume:

  • 1. Fluter and afib occur as similar types of cardiac arrhythmias that begin when the atria contract irregularly, resulting in insufficient blood flow to the ventricles and inefficient blood pumping throughout the body.
  • 2. Fluter precedes afib. Fluter may stop after a while or may develop into afib, where arrhythmia occurs more regularly.
  • 3. Fluter and afib are common in people who are predisposed or already have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, or mitral valve disorders.
  • 4. Electric shock and medications can cure flutter and afib. The most difficult treatment is to replace the connection between the atria and ventricles with an artificial pacemaker.

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